Atoms for Peace is Dead – Reexamining Okinawan Contemporary History Through Post-311 Fukushima


Futenma - A Life with the Military Base
Photo: Ojo de Cineasta on flickr
(日本語による原文下部に掲載)[1]

1.
Given that it is over a thousand kilometers distance from Fukushima Daiichi, the society of Okinawa at the moment does not appear to suffer much effect from the nuclear accident. Even though a small amount of radioactive substances must be flying over through the sky, the islands of Okinawa are excluded from the “nuclear plant map” of Japan, repeatedly broadcasted on TV, since the prefecture does not host any nuclear plants. The absence on the map might have given an impression to the rest of the nation that Okinawa is the only safe zone, free of radiation in the country. At the same time, due to the fact that we see almost no changes in the routine lifelines or on a material basis, it is undeniable that Okinawans tend to resonate and internalize such images of their home unconsciously.

We ought to be cautious, however, of this uncanny sense of peacefulness. Day by day I find it crucial that we delve into our imagination to further examine this matter.

Nuclear energy is part of the development of nuclear technology, which originated in the development of military technology in the mid-20th century. As revealed in the course of the current disaster, the exclusiveness of electric companies, atomic industries and the national policy on nuclear energy entails characteristics of having been “established by the political force without waiting for a technical maturity,” and having “always carried militaristically touchy elements within”[2] So it is that, even if Okinawa does not suffer direct damage from the Fukushima disaster, it is inseparable from the problems that have arisen from 3/11, and it should not be exempt from our attention in that regard.

It is important to acknowledge that nuclear issues exist at the core of the problematic of Okinawan contemporary history, and therefore it is crucial to reexamine it through the experience of 3/11 and Fukushima as a moment. That is to say, thinking through the unbearable anxiety shared among the people in the disaster-stricken area, their distrust towards the state, capital and science, and their cries from the threat forced upon their lives is indispensable for strengthening and deepening our recognition of recent history, and drawing a longer line of temporality from the past to the future. It is necessary that we stay sensible and conscious of the common horizon of recognition.

 

2.
Since the 1950s US military bases in Okinawa have been deemed A-bomb bases, as US presidents Eisenhower, Kennedy and Nixon publicly called them. They have held nuclear-armed missiles such as Nike Hercules, and hosted nuclear marine propulsions for a call at a port, causing the problems of radioactive cobalt-60 (i.e., the exposure of base workers to radiation, as Kenzaburo Oe reported in his well-known reportage Okinawa Notes, published in 1970). Meanwhile, as the secret agreement on Okinawa Reversion has been gradually revealed, suspicion persists in nuclear weapons having been carried on and stored in the bases even after 1972, the year of reversion. Furthermore, after the recent incident of a US Marine helicopter crash at the Okinawa International University in 2004, a radioactive material–strontium-90–was detected at the site on the campus[3].

Such rapports of nuclear weapons’ presence with military bases have had a great impact on Okinawa in various contexts: its history, politics, society and culture. If I mention but an example of the US oppression on local residents during the 1950s, it is the first Ryukyu University Incident in 1953, that was triggered by a photo  exhibition entitled “Atomic Bomb Exhibition,” organized by a group of students, who had been shocked by a magazine article on the atomic bomb victims from Hiroshima and Nagasaki. They organized it without a permit from the US military government and were later indicted[4]. While media censorship on A-bomb damages had already been called off on mainland Japan, Okinawans still had to mute their voices and opinions regarding the issue. This epitomized the primal position of Okinawa during the US military occupation that separated Okinawa from Japan under Article 3 of the Treaty of Peace with Japan. (The treaty was concluded in 1951, but this merely embodied a transformation of the wartime occupation into permanent military control.) During the same period when the strategy of mass retaliation, namely, Eisenhower’s “New Look” developed its dependence on nuclear weapons, what the US mostly feared was that Okinawans could take Hiroshima and Nagasaki incidents as their own issue, instead of distant events, and thereby pay attention to the problems of their islands under US “exclusive rule,” and develop criticisms against it upon realizing the present social contradiction that military presence is deeply embedded in their livelihood.
Around the same time on mainland Japan, the Lucky Dragon No. 5 incident caused by the hydrogen bomb test at Bikini Atoll brought strong opposition against nuclear weapons as well as US military strategy. Unlike in Okinawa under US military rule, on mainland Japan the people were able to organize nuclear disarmament movements on a grassroots level and extensively linked the movements for the First World Conference against Nuclear and Hydrogen Bombs, held in Hiroshima in 1955. However, the social movement was weakened thereafter during the course of clearing Japan’s “nuke allergy” by way of introducing a “Faustian contract” (Peter Kuznik) on the peaceful use of atomic energy, namely, Eisenhower’s “Atoms for Peace” doctrine[5]. Okinawa’s difference from Japan is equal to the difference between Article 3 of Treaty of Peace with Japan and the US-Japan Mutual Security Treaty. That is to say, the southern islands were kept in a “stateless” status under US exclusive rule — instead of being ruled by the UN acknowledged trusteeship of the US — under the bizarre international law. At the same time, it is a reflection of the Janus–faced characteristics of US nuclear strategy: mass-retaliation by nuclear weapons and “Atoms for Peace.” It was half a century later that the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident revealed the true substance of the matter by having blown one of these two heads away.

3.
As is widely known by now, the main concern for the US during the process of Okinawa Reversion was to maintain the free use of the military bases, and ultimately the operation of nuclear bases. This is the core of the vital importance the US has sought in Okinawa since around 1950, as insisted by the so-called Ryukyu Working Group consisting of the Department of State, the Joint Chiefs of Staff and the Department of Defense, while it was considering a concrete negotiation for the Reversion of Okinawa.

‘Vital’ is a more essential and active word than ‘Keystone’ that the US used to describe Okinawa military bases. ‘Keystone,’ implying a stationary architectural structure, is used to describe a support for the body of US military strategy. On the other hand, ‘vital’ comes from a Latin word vita or vitalis, an adjective used for life-forms. The expression to describe Okinawa as ‘vital’ is often seen in US official archives, first of which was Douglass McArthur’s speech in March 1948. At the meeting with George F. Kennan, then-Director of Policy Planning at the Dept. of State, McArthur stated that “Okinawa has vital importance” and if enough “air power” is deployed there, the US will be able to defend not only the Japanese archipelago but also Northeast to Southeast Asia as well as the entire western Pacific[6]. Although McArthur did not mention the term nuclear weapons then, his emphasis on “air power” meant that in the context of post-Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bombings.

Following the success of Russia’s 1949 atomic bomb test, the outbreak of the Korean War led the US to start installing nuclear weapons on overseas bases in and around Europe. Furthermore in the 1950s, following again the success of the Russian hydrogen bomb test, the US began nuclear deployment in Asia during the time of tension between mainland China and Taiwan over the crisis of the Taiwan Straits. By the time Eisenhower was leaving the government at the end of the 50s, US bases in Guam, the Philippines, South Korea, Taiwan and Okinawa hosted approximately 1,700 on-the-ground nuclear weapons, almost half of which (approx. 800) belonged to Kadena Air Force Base where the bombers under Strategic Air Command (SAC) were stationed. Curtis LeMay, the chief of USAF and SAC and also the planner of the WWII bombing strategy against Japan, including the Tokyo Air Raid, had great confidence in delivering nuclear weapons to oversea bases as well as tactics of using them.

It was around the time of the Korean War that McArthur’s view of Okinawa’s vital importance attained a realistic ground vis-à-vis nuclear weapons. In early March 1951, McArthur requested the Truman administration order an attack with nuclear weapons on North Korea and its areas bordering with China. As of the end of March, the lieutenant general George Stratemeyer of USAF announced that the nuclear facility in Kadena Air Base was ready for actual operation, in other words, except for nuclear capsules, the main construction of atomic bombs had been completed by then. In early April, Truman fired McArthur; it is said that his insistence on the nuclear attack was the reason for his dismissal. However, six months later, USAF performed a simulation A-bombing on North Korea named “Operation Hudson Harbor,” launching B-29 from Kadena Air Base to drop a mock A-bomb filled with TNT gunpowder[7].

Thereafter in the 60s especially during the Vietnam War, it was said that the US performed atomic bombing drills, and as mentioned by the farmer Shoko Ahagon who fought the land struggle against compulsory expropriation by the US Forces in Ie-jima Island, such drilling was performed over and over again in the US rifle training center in Maja-village, built on land forcibly taken from the locals. And this drilling triggered the local residents to develop further oppositional consciousness for their anti-US base movement. Later Ahagon walked into the mock atomic bombing site and collected remains of the bombshells, which are now displayed at the Nuchidutakara [life is treasure] Anti-war Museum in Ie-jima Island[8].

Fundamentally, the basis of all land struggles in occupied Okinawa, including the dispute of Ie-jima in particular, has been non-violent direct action, civil disobedience by the residents. They have always fought “not to let them use their land for killing,” criticizing the pro-military policy and calling to bring back the land for life and productions. While the US forces are composed as a giant military machine that possesses highly destructive murderous weapons such as thermo-nuclear bombs, the people of Okinawa have always fought bare-handed against it, as they often call it. Although Raymond Williams said: “military technologies are an important element of structuring social order,” the social order in Okinawa under US occupation was embodied by the distance between nuclear weaponry and hoes and sickles.[9] Many of those whose land was taken by the military sought to make a living by taking jobs at the bases, calling them “military labor,” but such jobs only gave hoes and sickles to the people to pick up rocks and dig unused bombs out, in providing the labor to construct facilities and runways — the state-of-the-art weaponry.
The vital importance of Okinawa for US forces was also carved into the livelihood of Okinawans, in other words, the maintenance of their financial stability, labor and land. In addition, out of numerous American corporations that were involved in building Okinawa military bases, included were the contractors for construction of domestic nuclear facilities since the Manhattan Project.

In the numerous Okinawan post-war testimonies, the name “AJ Company” is often mentioned by the people reminiscing about their military labor. The base construction in Okinawa began with a joint venture of Guy F. Atkinson Company and J. A. Jones that exclusively contracted the projects from the US military. Founded in 1910, the Atkinson Company grew rapidly during their contract for a nuclear production facility in Hanford, WA. The Hanford nuclear facility had produced Plutonium, which was used for Trinity, the first test of the Manhattan Project, as well as for the A-bomb “Fat Man” dropped in Nagasaki. Jones Company had participated in construction of the nuclear research facility in Oakridge TN. The merged company of Atkinson and Jones was not only contracted for Okinawa bases but also by General Electric when it replaced Dupont for a plutonium facility in Hanford. Another contractor for Hanford, Morrison-Knudsen Co. also participated in Okinawa base construction[10].

To date no exact official document has been found  concerning the involvement of the above US contractors in the construction of nuclear facilities in Okinawa, aside from the projects in Hanford or Oakridge. However, the US military had already been nuclear-armed at the time of the Okinawan constructions, and at the time of the negotiation for the Reversion of Okinawa, the US assigned Kadena and Henoko stations as their nuclear storage facilities. The establishment of the extremely controlled society (aka. plutonium economy) forced almost 1,500 households to move out of the Hanford vicinity, for the realization of Manhattan Project and later for the production of plutonium, the ultimate nuclear substance, all of which were planned and pursued by the US Army Engineering Corps. Similarly in Okinawa, for the vital importance of the bases, the Army Engineering Corps forced many civilians to move off of their land and work for the US contractors of aforementioned history.

4.

Shortly after the 3/11 earthquake, NHK Okinawa repeatedly reported that the US military had announced that the Marines were ready to be dispatched to the affected area for disaster rescue, just awaiting for a request from the Japanese government. Under the name of “Operation Tomodachi [friendship],” the US Forces with Marines began sending a nuclear aircraft carrier to the coast of Fukushima. The garish impression the operation gave to the public, blended later with another garishness: the killing of Osama Bin Ladin, performed as if a public execution. Together they seem to have impressed the Okinawan public with a sign of US decline, rather than a fear of its magnitude of power.

Many Okinawans are aware that Operation Tomodachi is more a deception staged for the benefit of the US government and Japan-US alliance than a genuine project for humanitarian aid. It is also thought to be an excuse for the US military to legitimately gain access to public airports and air facilities for their military use. But it makes us question more fundamental characteristics of the military itself: i.e., as epitomized in Eisenhower’s Janus-faced nuclear strategy, it is difficult to believe that their basis of humanitarian aid comes from ‘good will’, while they unfold indiscriminate massacres in Iraq and Afghanistan, and commit crimes on a daily basis in Okinawa. Not to mention that Kevin Maher, who branded Okinawans as “stupid” when he was the US consul general of Okinawa, took charge in mediation for the operation. (Then, in May, he turned to be a business consultant in a company, working for nuclear fuel recycling industries, in which Richard Lawless, the former Deputy Under Secretary of Defense for Asian and Pacific Affairs during the Bush administration, is one of the executives.)

The situation does not seem unproblematic at all. Since the 2000s, Lieutenant General Wallace C. Gregson and the Okinawa Marine Corps deputy assistant chief of staff Robert D. Eldridge have been aiming to “strengthen the Japan-US partnership and develop a maritime base jointly for US and Japanese forces to support humanitarian aid and rescue work,” at the same time as constantly placing emphasis on “humanitarian aid” and “disaster relief” in the magazine issued by the Marines in Okinawa[11]. Furthermore, at the Okinawa Policy Council’s Subcommittee on Burden Reduction, meeting shortly after 3/11, the Defense minister of Japan Toshimi Kitazawa proposed use of the airports in Miyako and Shimoji Islands as “international base stations in case of a large scale disaster emergency.” Although the Ministry of Defense insists that Kitazawa’s statement was solely a response to the proposal of Okinawa Prefecture for its role for “International contribution by the establishment of disaster relief base in Asia-Pacific region,” the US-Japan alliance seems to take advantage of the confusion at the scene of fire, a move to which we need pay attention, as it is veiled under the seemingly contradictory plans for the base relocation: unifying Kadena and securing Henoko[12].

Ever since 3/11, the contemporary history of Okinawa has been at a crucial turning point. As the struggles against building new Marine air stations and bases in Henoko and Takae continue, this past April 2011, on their visit to Okinawa for inspection of Futenma Relocation issues, the United States House Committee on Armed Services was met by more than 22,000 plaintiffs of the third Kadena Noise Pollution case. Kadena Air Base has been a symbolic element of vital importance of Okinawa bases. In addition, in synchronicity with Kadena plaintiffs, the landowners of Camp Schwab in Henoko that has been said to have nuclear storage and of Camp Hansen that hosts a simulation facility for contra-guerilla urban warfare, are raising their voices against renewal of the land contract. These are, as it were, Okinawans’ time-lagged response, their rejection against the terms: “return to Henoko” and “deterrent” used in the campaign for the military realignment during the Hatoyama administration. At the same time, I have to stress, an optimism in action observed in the people’s movements intervening in the history of militarization is the very element that has been moving forward the contemporary history of nuclear-burdened Okinawa.

On May 7th 2011, in a Ustream live broadcast from the massive anti-nuke demonstration in Shibuya Tokyo, we saw young people scream: “We don’t need nuke plants,” “Save children,” “Right to live, No to profit,” along with a sound system truck that hung a banner in big letters, “’Atoms for Peace’ is Dead.” All these seem to tell us that at the moment the people in Japan are facing crisis and fissures of their history, in which they are struggling to find a new identity and common consciousness of the world. The Japanese people, who have long identified themselves with a pessimism of the world internalized in the state policy and covered themselves with a cynicism, are about to experience changes confronting the abyss of the history. Okinawa too ought to see and ascertain the changes as such. Let us all go forward together for “’Atoms for Peace’ is Dead” and beyond.

 


[1] This article was originally published in Impaction, No. 180.

[2] 高木仁三郎『市民科学者として生きる』(岩波書店、1999年)88ページ。

[3]See 黒澤亜利子編『沖国大がアメリカに占領された日—8・13米軍ヘリ墜落事件から見えてきた沖縄/日本の縮図—』(青土社、2005年)。Concerning the effects of strontium-90, the Kyoto University professor Hideaki Koide has detailed a number of times.

[4]On this incident, see琉球大学教授職員会・大学人九条の会沖縄編『琉大事件とは何だったのか』(高良鉄美/琉球大学大学院法務研究科、2010年)を参照(県外の一般書店では入手困難。インターネット書店では、Books Mangrooveで取扱。[http://books.mangroove.jp/?pid=21470590])。

[5] Peter Kuznick, “Japan’s Nuclear History in Perspective: Eisenhower and Atoms for War and Peace,” Bulletin of Atomic Scientists: Web Edition, 13 April 2011. [http://thebulletin.org/web-edition/features/japans-nuclear-history-perspective-eisenhower-and-atoms-war-and-peace].

The problematic consciousness about the historical process through which nuclear power was introduced to Japan’s civil society is now shared within the de-nuke movement as the origin of 3/11 by way of historical investigations and documentaries.

See Yoshihiko Ikegami, “Introducing Postwar History in the Nuclear Accident Debate,” Japan: Fissures in Planetary Apparatus, 7 May 2011 [http://jfissures.wordpress.com/2011/05/07/introducing-post-war-history-in-the-nuclear-accident-debate/])、And Peace Philosophy Center Blog, 14 May 2011([http://peacephilosophy.blogspot.com/2011/05/nhk.html].

[6] “Conversation between General of the Army MacArthur and Mr. George F. Kennan,” 5 March 1948, FRUS, 1948, VI, pp.699 – 702; “Conversation between General of the Army MacArthur, Under Secretary of the Army Draper, and Mr. George Kennan,” 21 March 1948, ibid., pp. 709 – 710.
Robert S. Norris, William M. Arkin and William Burr, “Where They Were,” Bulletin of Atomic Scientists, November/December 1999, pp.26 – 35.

[7] Bruce Cumings, “Spring Thaw for Korea?,” Bulletin of Atomic Scientists, April 1992, pp.14 – 23.

[8]阿波根昌鴻『米軍と農民—沖縄県・伊江島—』(岩波新書、1973年)、また、阿波根氏の撮影した写真集『人間の生きている島—沖縄・伊江島土地闘争の記録—』(自費出版、1982年)を参照。

[9] Raymond Williams, “The Politics of Nuclear Disarmament,” in E. P. Thompson, ed., Exterminism and Cold War (London: Verso, 1982).

[10] 『沖縄文化研究』(法政大学沖縄文化研究所、第29号、2003年)所収の拙稿「ジープと砂塵」等を参照。Also see: Bulletin of Atomic Scientists, July 1948, ”Atomic Energy 1948: A Business Week Report”.

[11] Concerning Gregson et al, see a journal supported by the Ministry of Defense,『Securitarian』557〜559号(防衛弘済会、2005年)

In 2004, Eldridge commented on the deployment of the US Marine Corps in 『沖縄タイムス』, in which he stresses a must to appreciate the efforts of the US Forces stationed in Okinawa as well as the significance of military capabilities for the success of disaster rescue.

「米海兵隊の支援活動に対してフィリピンの被害者をはじめ同政府の反応は大変感動的で、感謝ばかりである。(中略)沖縄ではフィリピンの被害者への同情があれば、フィリピンでの苦痛を救済するための在沖米軍の努力を支持すべきである。それ以下は、すでに正当性を失った「一国平和主義」の延長にすぎない。少なくとも「軍事利用」の定義が広すぎ、常識からすれば軍による人道支援活動はその解釈内に入らない。この規模の震災・人道支援活動を成功するのには、海兵隊のような軍という組織しか、能力(訓練、経験、指揮統制、物資、運搬)とその好意を持っていない。」(『沖縄タイムス』2004年12月19日)

In passing, before he joined the Marines in Okinawa, Eldridge was a scholar of international politics; in Kobe University he studied with Makoto Iokibe, the president of National Defense Academy of Japan and the chairman of the Recovery Committee of the Great Disaster of Eastern Japan.

[12] 『琉球新報』2011年5月24日。

 

PDF (English)

——————————————–

“Atoms for Peace is Dead”

〈3.11以後〉〈フクシマ〉を通して沖縄現代史を問い直す

若林 千代(沖縄大学教員)

一、

沖縄は事故のあった福島第一原発から1000キロ以上離れており、現時点では、沖縄社会は一見、表面上は事故の影響をあまり受けていないように見える。実際にごく微量の放射性物質が飛来しているとしても、沖縄には原子力発電所が存在していないから、事故の後、繰り返しテレビで流されている全国の原発マップのなかに沖縄は見あたらない。そのため、あたかも沖縄が放射能汚染を逃れている国内唯一の地域であるかのような印象を全国の人びとに与えたかもしれない。同時に、沖縄のなかでも、ライフラインや物質的なことがほとんど何も変化していないこともあると思うが、そうしたイメージを無意識のうちに反復し、内面化する傾向がまったくないとは言い難い。

しかし、この奇妙な「安心感」には強く警戒しなければならない。想像力や掘り下げて考える力が大切だと、日々に思う。

原子力発電は核開発の一環であり、そして、核開発の起源は20世紀なかばの軍事的な科学技術開発にある。今回の事故のなかで明らかにされた電力会社や原子力産業、国家の原子力政策の閉鎖性は、高木仁三郎が繰り返し示してきたように、「技術の成熟を待たずに強引に政治的に形成されてきた」という原発開発の性格と同時に、「常に軍事的に機微な側面を抱える」という性格からきている。とすれば、沖縄は現時点で福島第一原発事故の直接的な被災はないとしても、3・11、あるいは〈フクシマ〉の示す問題から決して逃れてはいないだろうし、目をそらしてはならないだろう。

むしろ、核問題は常に沖縄の現代史的課題の核心部分に存在しており、3・11を契機として、あるいは〈フクシマ〉を通して、沖縄の現代史それ自体をも問い直すことが大切だと感じる。被災されている方々の抱える、足下から立ち上ってくるようないのちへの不安、国家・資本・科学に対する不信、生活を脅かされることの嘆きをともに考えることが、沖縄の歴史的現在を考えるうえでも大切であり、どうすれば現代史をめぐる認識を強くし、深くする契機にできるか、過去から未来へ時間のものさしを長く引いてみたときにどれほど決定的か、自覚的に考え、認識の地平を開くのに繊細でありたいと思う。

 

二、

沖縄の米軍基地は、1950年代以来、アイゼンハワーやケネディ、ニクソンら歴代の米国大統領から公然と「原爆基地」とされ、ナイキ・ハーキュリーズなど核搭載可能なミサイルの配備、原子力艦船の寄港とコバルト60の問題、軍作業員の被曝、また、この間返還密約をめぐって徐々に明らかにされているように、1972年以後も核兵器の持ち込みや貯蔵の疑いは残っている。最近では、2004年に起きた沖縄国際大学キャンパスへの米海兵隊ヘリの墜落事件の際、現場から放射性物質のストロンチウム90が検出されている[i]

そうした核と基地の関係は、沖縄の歴史、政治、社会、文化等々のさまざまな文脈のなかに影響を及ぼしてきた。1950年代の米軍による民衆弾圧を取り上げても、たとえば、1953年の第一次琉大事件の発端は、処分を受けた学生らが、前年に『朝日グラフ』が公表した原爆被害の報道に衝撃を受け、米軍に「無許可」で開催した「原爆展」であった[ii]。原爆被害をめぐる報道の規制や検閲はすでに本土では解除されていたが、沖縄では依然として自由に触れることができないもの、ひそひそと囁かれるもののままであった。ここに対日講和条約第3条の下、日本から分離され、米軍の直接的な軍事支配を受けた沖縄の位置の問題がある。

アイゼンハワーの「ニュールック」、すなわち、核兵器への依存を強めた大量報復戦略が打ち出されたこの時期、米軍がもっとも恐れたのは、〈ヒロシマ〉や〈ナガサキ〉を、沖縄から遠く離れた場所の出来事としてではなく、そうした核兵器や核開発の問題を契機として、民衆が自分たち自身の問題に、つまり、米軍による「排他的統治」の下にある沖縄のかかえている問題に目を向け、軍事が生存に深く食い込んでいる社会の矛盾を自覚し、批判を強めることであった。

日本本土でもこの時期、ビキニ環礁での水爆実験による第五福竜丸乗組員の被爆事件を契機として、核兵器への批判が高まった。沖縄と異なるのは、対日講和条約第3条の下、米軍の直接支配にある沖縄で「原爆展」を開催した学生たちは、アメリカに敵対する者として反共主義のなかで直接的に処罰されたが、日本本土の場合には、生活者のレベルでの草の根の核兵器廃絶の運動が展開され、1955年に広島市で開かれた原水爆禁止世界大会などにも結びついていった。しかし、そうした社会運動もまた、冷戦体制のなかでは、ピーター・カズニックの表現を借りれば、反核意識の強い日本が核大国アメリカに依存するという「ファウスト的契約」として、アイゼンハワーのもう一つの核戦略である「アトムズ・フォア・ピース」、すなわち、「原子力の平和利用」を背景として、徐々に原子力発電の導入による「原爆アレルギー」の払拭が画策された[iii]。沖縄と日本本土の違いは、対日講和条約第三条と日米安保条約の違いであると同時に、アメリカの核戦略のヤヌス的性格、つまり、核による大量報復戦略と「原子力の平和利用」という二つの性格の反映でもある。半世紀の後、福島第一原発事故は、その片方の頭を吹き飛ばし、ことの本質を暴露したということになるのだろう。

 

三、

今では広く知られているように、沖縄返還の過程において、アメリカにとって、その交渉の核心の問題は基地の「自由使用」、すなわち、核基地としての機能の問題であった。それが、1950年前後から一貫して米軍が維持しようとしてきた「自由使用」、沖縄返還交渉を具体的に検討した米政府の国務省、統合参謀本部、国防総省が合同して組織した琉球作業グループの言うところの、沖縄の「死活的重要性vital importance」の欠かせざる核心である。

「死活的vital」とは、沖縄の軍事基地を形容するのに、米軍の側が名付けた「要石Keystone」よりももっと本質的で動態的な響きがある。「キーストーン」は米軍の軍事戦略の体系を支えるものという意味であり、それは一つの静態的な建築物の構造の比喩である。他方、「ヴァイタル」とは、ラテン語のvita、生命体に与えられる形容詞vitalisから生まれてきた言葉である。沖縄の軍事基地を「死活的」に重要とする言辞は、米国公文書のなかに頻繁に見られるものなのだが、その最初のものは、1948年3月のダグラス・マッカーサーの発言だろう。マッカーサーは、対日政策をめぐる国務省政策立案室長ジョージ・F・ケナンとの会談のなかで、「沖縄の基地は死活的に重要である」と述べ、沖縄に十分な「空軍力(エア・パワー)」が配備されるならば、日本列島はおろか、北東アジアから東南アジア、西太平洋全体をカバーする防衛をおこなうことが可能だとした[iv]。このときマッカーサーは核兵器に言及していない。だが、マッカーサーが「空軍力」を強調するとき、この空軍は、もちろん、すでに広島と長崎の二つの原爆投下以後のそれであった。

核配備そのものに関して言えば、1949年のソ連の原爆実験の成功を経た後、朝鮮戦争の勃発は、アメリカがヨーロッパを中心に海外基地に核を配備するきっかけとなり、さらに1950年代、ソ連の水爆実験成功を経て、アジアでは台湾海峡問題のなかで核配備がすすんだとされる。1950年代末、アイゼンハワーが政権を降りる時期には、グアム、フィリピン、韓国、台湾、そして沖縄への地上配備のアメリカの核兵器は、全体でおよそ1,700であったが、そのうちの半数近い800が、戦略航空軍団(SAC)所属の爆撃機の駐留していた嘉手納空軍基地への配備であったと言われている[v]。戦略航空軍団の総司令官で空軍参謀長であったカーティス・ルメイは、東京大空襲など対日戦略爆撃を立案した人物であるが、彼は海外基地への核兵器の運搬や攻撃を遂行する技術について強い自信をもっていた。

マッカーサーの沖縄の「死活的重要性」という見解が、核兵器をめぐってより具体的に現実に反映されるのは、朝鮮戦争の時期である。1951年3月初旬、マッカーサーは戦線の空軍の優位性を確かなものとするため、核兵器による北朝鮮と中朝国境付近の攻撃をトルーマン政権に要求した。米空軍のジョージ・ストラスマイヤー将軍は、3月末の段階で、嘉手納基地に配備されている核搭載施設は稼働態勢にあるとし、つまり、核カプセルの部分を除けば、原爆の最終組み立ては完了していた。4月初旬、トルーマンはマッカーサーを解任し、しばしば彼の更迭は核攻撃の主張によるものだと言われている。しかし、その半年後、米空軍は「ハドソン・ハーバー作戦」と名付けられた、北朝鮮での原爆投下のシュミレーション爆撃をおこない、嘉手納からB29戦略爆撃機を出撃させ、実際にTNT火薬が詰められた模擬原爆を投下している[vi]

沖縄ではその後、とくに1960年代、ベトナム戦争の時期、核爆弾投下訓練がおこなわれていたとされ、伊江島土地闘争をたたかった農民、阿波根昌鴻氏は、真謝の土地を強制収用して作られた米軍射爆訓練場でもそうした訓練が繰り返され、それへの危機意識が反基地運動にも影響をもたらしたことを示唆している。阿波根氏は、そこで使用されていた模擬原爆の残骸を拾い、それは今日、伊江島の反戦平和資料館「ヌチドゥタカラの家」に展示されている[vii]

伊江島土地闘争をはじめとする、沖縄の土地闘争は、基本的に非暴力直接行動による民衆の不服従の闘いであり、土地を「人殺しのために使わせない」、そして、軍事優先の政策を批判し、土地を生活と生産のために取り戻そうという闘いである。米軍は、熱核兵器を頂点とする、破壊的な殺傷力をもつ兵器を有する巨大な軍事組織であり、それに対して、しばしば沖縄で言われるように、人びとは「素手」で闘ってきた。レイモンド・ウィリアムズは、「軍事技術は社会秩序の構造の重要な要素である」と述べているが、米軍支配下での社会秩序とは、そのまま、核兵器と鍬や鎌の間にある距離であった[viii]。米軍に土地を奪われた場合、多くの人が「軍作業」と呼ばれる労働で家計を維持しようとしたが、それは、本来、鎌や鍬を握っていた手で、最新鋭の兵器が配備される軍施設や滑走路のために、石ころを拾ったり、不発弾を掘り出したりする仕事であった。

アメリカが執着し続けてきた沖縄の軍事基地の「死活的重要性」は、そうした沖縄民衆の生存に関わる事柄、つまり、土地や労働、家計の維持に深く食い込むものであった。さらに付け加えるならば、沖縄における米軍の基地建設では数多くの米国の建設会社がかかわっているが、そのなかには、マンハッタン計画以来の、アメリカの核開発施設の建設を請け負ってきた企業も含まれている。

沖縄戦後史の証言などを読むと、「軍作業」の思い出として、しばしば「AJカンパニー」という名前が出てくるが、沖縄における米軍の建設工事は、1946年、米国のガイ・F・アトキンソン社とJ・A・ジョーンズ社がジョイント・ベンチャーによって米軍から一括請負して始まった。1910年創業のアトキンソン社は、ワシントン州ハンフォードの核製造施設の建設工事で成長した。ハンフォードは、マンハッタン計画による最初の核実験「トリニティ」や長崎に投下された原爆「ファット・マン」に使用されたプルトニウムを製造した核施設である。また、ジョーンズ社は、テネシー州オークリッジの核研究施設の建設に参加した経験をもっていた。そして、この二つの企業の合弁は、沖縄での基地建設工事だけでなく、ハンフォードのプルトニウム製造工場の建設部門をデュポン社からジェネラル・エレクトリック社が引き継いだ際の下請け業者でもあった。さらに、同じくハンフォードの請負業者であったモリソン=クヌードセン社も沖縄の基地建設に参入していた[ix]

現在のところ、沖縄の米軍基地建設に関与したこれらのアメリカの建設会社が、ハンフォードやオークリッジと同じように、沖縄でも核施設の建設にかかわったという事実は報告されていない。しかし、米軍が沖縄で基地建設を始めた時点で、すでに米軍は核兵器を保有する軍隊であり、返還交渉のなかでも嘉手納や辺野古は核貯蔵施設として位置づけられている。マンハッタン計画のために、後にはプルトニウムという究極の核物質製造のために、ハンフォード周辺のおよそ1500世帯が移動を余儀なくされ、極度の管理社会(プルトニウム・エコノミー)が作られたが、これらを計画実行したのは米陸軍工兵部隊であった。沖縄でも同じく陸軍工兵部隊は、基地の「死活的重要性」のために数多くの人びとを郷里から追いだし、さらにこうした経歴をもつ請負業者の下での基地建設の労務に追いたてたのである。

 

四、

3月11日の震災直後、NHKの沖縄局から、米軍の情報として、米海兵隊はすでに災害救援活動の準備態勢を整えて日本政府の出動要請を待っているという報道が繰り返された。「トモダチ作戦」という名前でおこなわれたその作戦行動は、まず、原発事故が起きた福島県沖に原子力空母を派遣することであった。そのどぎつい印象は、その後、まるで「公開処刑」のようなビン・ラーディン暗殺のどぎつさとないまぜになって、アメリカへの恐怖というより、その凋落の兆候をますます強く沖縄の社会に印象づけたように思う。

沖縄の多くの市民は、「トモダチ作戦」がアメリカ政府と日米同盟の欺瞞であって、決して人道的な災害支援にならないと考えているが、それは、災害支援を口実に民間空港や施設の軍事利用を正当化されるかもしれないということだけではなく、もっと本質的な米軍の性格にかかわる。つまり、アイゼンハワーの核戦略のヤヌス的な性格同様、一方で無差別報復殺戮をイラクやアフガニスタンなど各地で繰り広げ、沖縄でも日常的に犯罪を起こす軍事組織を震災・人道支援活動を好意でおこなっている組織だと信じるのは、かなり難しいことだろう。まして、在職中に沖縄の市民を「バカ野郎」呼ばわりし続けた元沖縄総領事のケビン・メアが渉外を担当したとなればなおさらである。

だが、事態は決して楽観的とは言えない。ウォレス・グレグソン国防次官補やロバート・エルドリッヂ在沖縄米海兵隊基地外交政策部次長らは、2000年代から米軍の「日米のパートナーシップを強化し、人道支援と救援活動に対応できる日米共同の海上拠点の展開」を目指し、沖縄の海兵隊広報誌でも、もっぱら「人道支援」「災害支援」を強調してきた[x]。そして、東日本震災後、北沢俊美防衛相は、沖縄政策協議会の「基地負担軽減部会」の席上、「国際的な大規模災害に対応する緊急時の拠点」として、宮古・下地島空港の利用を提案している。防衛省側は、沖縄県の「アジア・太平洋地域の災害援助拠点の形成による国際貢献」の提言に対応したものだとしているが、こうした「火事場」に乗じた日米同盟の動きは、普天間移設をめぐる米議会軍事委員会の嘉手納統合案と辺野古堅持という一見対立しているかのように見える動きに隠れて、見えにくいものだが、注意する必要があるだろう[xi]

3・11以後、沖縄の現代史もまた、大きな転換点にある。辺野古や高江でのたたかいはもちろん、4月末、普天間移設問題の視察にきた米連邦議会軍事委員会を出迎えたのは、2万2000を超える人数に膨れあがった第三次嘉手納爆音訴訟の提訴であった。嘉手納飛行場は、沖縄の軍事基地の「死活的重要性」の象徴となってきた。また、嘉手納と同じく核貯蔵施設の存在が言われてきた辺野古のキャンプ・シュワーブの軍用地主のなかから、そして、対ゲリラ戦争のための都市型訓練施設のあるキャンプ・ハンセンの軍用地主のなかから、日本政府との新たな土地契約を拒否する声があがっている。こうしたことは、昨年の「辺野古回帰」と「抑止力」に対する、時間差の拒否の意思表示である。同時に、こうした歴史に介入する民衆の行動のオプティミズムこそが、核基地にされてきた沖縄の、現代史を動かしてきた重要な要素なのである。

5月7日、東京・渋谷での反原発デモを中継するUSTREAMの映像のなかに、拳をあげて「原発いらない」「子どもを守れ」「利権ではなく、生きる権利を」と叫ぶ若者たちの姿と、サウンド・カーの横断幕に掲げられた“Atoms for Peace is Dead”の大きな文字を見つけた。今、日本の人びとは、歴史の裂け目と危機に直面し、そこで苦闘しながら、新たなアイデンティティと世界意識を見いだそうともがいているのではないか。国家のもつペシミスティックな世界像に自ら同一化し、シニシズムに覆われていた日本の民衆は、歴史の淵に立って変容しつつある。沖縄においても、そうした変化を注意深く見極めていかなければならないと思う。”Atoms for Peace is Dead”とその先へ、さらに、さまざまな人と一緒に進んでいきたいと願う。

 


[i] 黒澤亜利子編『沖国大がアメリカに占領された日—8・13米軍ヘリ墜落事件から見えてきた沖縄/日本の縮図—』(青土社、2005年)。ストロンチウム90の放射能汚染については、小出裕章氏が寄稿。

[ii] 第一次琉大事件については、琉球大学教授職員会・大学人九条の会沖縄編『琉大事件とは何だったのか』(高良鉄美/琉球大学大学院法務研究科、2010年)を参照(県外の一般書店では入手困難。インターネット書店では、Books Mangrooveで取扱。[http://books.mangroove.jp/?pid=21470590])。

[iii] Peter Kuznick, “Japan’s Nuclear History in Perspective: Eisenhower and Atoms for War and Peace,” Bulletin of Atomic Scientists: Web Edition, 13 April 2011. [http://thebulletin.org/web-edition/features/japans-nuclear-history-perspective-eisenhower-and-atoms-war-and-peace]. 日本への原発導入の過程に対する問題意識は、現在、〈3・11〉の現代史的な起源として、ドキュメンタリーや歴史研究を通して、脱原発運動のなかで広く共有されるようになっている。池上善彦「原発事故に戦後史を導入する」(Japan: Fissures in Planetary Apparatus, 7 May 2011 [http://jfissures.wordpress.com/2011/05/07/introducing-post-war-history-in-the-nuclear-accident-debate/])、カナダ・バンクーバーのPeace Philosophy Center Blog, 14 May 2011([http://peacephilosophy.blogspot.com/2011/05/nhk.html])等を参照。

[iv] ケナンとマッカーサーの会談については以下の文書を参照。“Conversation between General of the Army MacArthur and Mr. George F. Kennan,” 5 March 1948, FRUS, 1948, VI, pp.699 – 702; “Conversation between General of the Army MacArthur, Under Secretary of the Army Draper, and Mr. George Kennan,” 21 March 1948, ibid., pp. 709 – 710.

[v] Robert S. Norris, William M. Arkin and William Burr, “Where They Were,” Bulletin of Atomic Scientists, November/December 1999, pp.26 – 35.

[vi] Bruce Cumings, “Spring Thaw for Korea?,” Bulletin of Atomic Scientists, April 1992, pp.14 – 23.

[vii] 阿波根昌鴻『米軍と農民—沖縄県・伊江島—』(岩波新書、1973年)、また、阿波根氏の撮影した写真集『人間の生きている島—沖縄・伊江島土地闘争の記録—』(自費出版、1982年)を参照。

[viii] Raymond Williams, “The Politics of Nuclear Disarmament,” in E. P. Thompson, ed., Exterminism and Cold War (London: Verso, 1982).

[ix]『沖縄文化研究』(法政大学沖縄文化研究所、第29号、2003年)所収の拙稿「ジープと砂塵」等を参照。また、Bulletin of Atomic Scientistsの1948年7月号の”Atomic Energy 1948: A Business Week Report”も参照。

[x] グレグソンらの研究については、防衛省が編集協力している『Securitarian』557〜559号(防衛弘済会、2005年)を参照。エルドリッヂは、2004年のフィリピンでの災害支援に海兵隊が参加したことについて、『沖縄タイムス』に投書して、以下のように述べている。「米海兵隊の支援活動に対してフィリピンの被害者をはじめ同政府の反応は大変感動的で、感謝ばかりである。(中略)沖縄ではフィリピンの被害者への同情があれば、フィリピンでの苦痛を救済するための在沖米軍の努力を支持すべきである。それ以下は、すでに正当性を失った「一国平和主義」の延長にすぎない。少なくとも「軍事利用」の定義が広すぎ、常識からすれば軍による人道支援活動はその解釈内に入らない。この規模の震災・人道支援活動を成功するのには、海兵隊のような軍という組織しか、能力(訓練、経験、指揮統制、物資、運搬)とその好意を持っていない。」(『沖縄タイムス』2004年12月19日)エルドリッヂは、在沖海兵隊に所属する前は大阪大学に勤めていた国際政治学者であり、神戸大学では、現在、東日本大震災後の復興構想会議議長を務める五百旗部真防衛大学校長のもとで学んだ。

[xi] 『琉球新報』2011年5月24日。

 

PDF (日本語)

 




Comments (7 comments)

  1. Atoms for Peace is Dead – Reexamining Okinawan Contemporary History Through Post-311 Fukushima | No Nukes Action Committee, [...] for a technical maturity,” and having “always carried militaristically touchy elements within”[2] So it is that, even if Okinawa does not suffer direct damage from the Fukushima disaster, it is [...]
    April 3rd, 2013 at 10:45 pm
  2. Atoms for Peace is Dead – Reexamining Okinawan Contemporary History Through Post-311 Fukushima / “Atoms for Pe ace is Dead” 〈3.11以後〉〈フクシマ〉を通して沖縄現代史を問い直す | No Nukes Action Committee, [...] It was around the time of the Korean War that McArthur’s view of Okinawa’s vital importance attained a realistic ground vis-à-vis nuclear weapons. In early March 1951, McArthur requested the Truman administration order an attack with nuclear weapons on North Korea and its areas bordering with China. As of the end of March, the lieutenant general George Stratemeyer of USAF announced that the nuclear facility in Kadena Air Base was ready for actual operation, in other words, except for nuclear capsules, the main construction of atomic bombs had been completed by then. In early April, Truman fired McArthur; it is said that his insistence on the nuclear attack was the reason for his dismissal. However, six months later, USAF performed a simulation A-bombing on North Korea named “Operation Hudson Harbor,” launching B-29 from Kadena Air Base to drop a mock A-bomb filled with TNT gunpowder[7]. [...]
    April 3rd, 2013 at 10:55 pm
  3. Atoms for Peace is Dead – Reexamining Okinawan Contemporary History Through Post-311 Fukushima / “Atoms for Pe ace is Dead” 〈3.11以後〉〈フクシマ〉を通して沖縄現代史を問い直す | No Nukes Action Committee, [...] the Japanese archipelago but also Northeast to Southeast Asia as well as the entire western Pacific[6]. Although McArthur did not mention the term nuclear weapons then, his emphasis on “air power” [...]
    April 4th, 2013 at 2:43 am
  4. Atoms for Peace is Dead – Reexamining Okinawan Contemporary History Through Post-311 Fukushima | why u.s. bases in okinawa?, [...] for a technical maturity,” and having “always carried militaristically touchy elements within”[2] So it is that, even if Okinawa does not suffer direct damage from the Fukushima disaster, it is [...]
    May 2nd, 2013 at 3:06 pm

Post a comment